Category Archives: Political

Go, the Mass is Upended

Go, the Mass is ended, secret children no more
Evil works uncovered
As it’s now reported to you.

Go, the Mass is ended,Tuam now tell
the world
These lives undone, the time has come
These children harmed no one.

Go, the Mass is ended, secret children no more
We promise your Mammies loved you
You were always stolen from them.

Go, the Mass is ended, evil of the cloth,
You imprisoned light, from them robbed life
Now Justice must be served.

Go, the Mass is ended, hearts break across our land
Give these women courage
Spread the word, we’re coming for you.

Go, the Mass is ended, leave no stone unturned
This day is yours, unearth that world
Institute of fear now burn.

An Peann

In memory of the almost 800 children found in Tuam. My family’s thoughts are with every woman who was imprisoned in a Mother and Baby home in Ireland during those dark times, my heart breaks for you, you did nothing wrong.
You carried life,sadly life was stolen from you. You were wronged by the hands of evil. Thank you Catherine Corless (Local Historian) for revealing the truth.
For the sisters of no mercy, you never nursed the sick to dying, you murdered them with neglect. Your God is waiting for you.

 

Reclaim Ownership

You began in a watery cave of dreams.
A place where you paid no rent.
You were given shelter, nourishment and protection.
As all these gifts were given, you grew from a cell.

Out you came, unknowing.
Without debt, you credited the world with your presence.
You drank the milk of your creator.
You ate when your body was ready.

You wriggled, rolled, crawled then walked.
You ran when your legs gathered speed.
Learning was first mimicked, then taught.
Thinking became realised, then censored.

Rules became laws. Right was not wrong.
You stepped into line, there was a queue.
You followed the crowd, became a pawn.
You believed you were contributing.

You woke up one day, disillusioned.
With all the years of sculpting
YOU REALISE
Society had repossessed your hopes.

You take your awareness to the court.
The Court of Moral Awareness.
You present your case, success is promised.
You tell counsel this:

I began in a watery cave of dreams.
A place where I paid no rent.
I was given shelter, nourishment and protection.
As all these gifts were given, I grew from a cell.

The Judge who presides over Court asks you
‘What are you arguing for?’
You reply, ‘I have come to reclaim ownership.
I have the right to own my thinking.’

On returning from The Chamber of Conscience
The judge straightens his thinking stating
‘I wish more people would come to my court.
The mind is the property of oneself.’

You look the Judge straight in the eye.
The resemblance between you both is uncanny.
You resolve to take full responsibility going forward.
You will never pay dues on your own thinking again.

An Peann

 

Where Cold Ghosts Meet

On Grafton Street she was putting the finishing touches to her chalked coloured masterpiece.
She drew love hearts over all the i’s, pretty they were in their painful disguise.

I had seen her work before, on the ground of Henry Street, her colours then washed away by the man in the truck that sweeps.

I never made time to read them, you know how we are sometimes in a rush?

Last night, I stopped.
I stopped, instead of glancing at the wares inside the windows of the Brown Thomas shop.

I stopped, became moved without moving.
Together we read her chalked words.
Her message reminded us how we should never look down on others.
I asked her could I sit down?
Together we shared a space on the cold October ground.

Her Mother gifted her to the State when she was 12.
Pragmatically she explained, it was for her own safety’s sake.

I asked her was she not fostered?
Shaking her head she told me how her Mam still had rights at the time.
Voluntarily she entrusted her into the arms of the state,
with a promise and a hope to take back home some day.

‘Where did you grow up?’ I asked her.
It turned out we we both grew up in Tallaght.
Looking at her face, I felt I could have known her Mother.
She explained that she grew up in Jobstown, I said ‘so did I’.
She looked back at me with shock in her eyes.

She calls herself April.
She is 18 and a half years old.
She grew up running away from various Care Homes, she didn’t like the hostels, she said ‘it’s not safe to sleep on the street.’

‘I have a tent, another couple stay there too, no one comes near us.’ She assured me it was somewhere safe to rest her pretty red head.

She has somewhere to have a shower every day at nine.
She goes to Art classes in a homeless project, to pass away the time.

More than anything she just wants a real home, so she can go back to school.
This young girl has had it hard, but she is nobody’s fool.
She is waiting for aftercare, the social worker closed her case.
Eighteen years old, no longer a care for the State.

April wants to go to Trinity, she reads a lot.
To study history, even be an archaeologist some day.

I told her she was too beautiful for the streets, she said ‘ah, thanks, thanks a lot.’ She really was ever so sweet.

April grew up across the river from where I lived.
The river being a trickle that divides a multitude of lives.

I am sorry for you, I said.
I don’t feel sorry for you.
I am just sorry you have to live this life.

We hugged, longer than we needed to.

April being no fool, is burdened by circumstances.

She is just a young girl who deserves the right to go back to school.

An Peann

I asked April was it okay to write about her, she said it was okay. If you are reading this, stay safe.
You will go to Trinity some day.
Big Hug.xxx

The Irish House Sat Empty

Commemorations, financial exoneration’s.
A Centenary Hung Dail.
Yet today the Irish House sat empty.

A chair sits vacant tonight, someone lost their fight, they struggled to see the light.
Yet today the Irish House sat empty.

Let them Debate, the Minds of our Mental Health State, before another man, woman or child loses the battle of their fate.
Yet today the Dail sat empty.

We walk in thousands from darkness to light to raise awareness for the plight.
Yet today the Dail sat empty.

Our Mental health is our wealth.
Our friends are crying, people are dying, charities are screaming out for time.
This Irish Institution of the dying.
It is nothing but a crime.
Yet today the Dail sat almost empty.

An Peann